Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra)

DATE 1/24/2018

By: Brianna Egge

 Ohio Buckeye Form

Aesculus glabra, or commonly known as Ohio buckeye, is native to the southern United States and are found typically growing in wooded areas of valleys, ravines, and bluff bases.. It is a small to medium sized tree with low branching and grows 20-40 feet tall with a broad rounded crown. Ohio buckeye survives in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-7. They grow in average well-drained soils in full sun to part shade but prefer moist, fertile soils. If conditions are too dry, the leaves will tend to scorch up and lose their aesthetic value.
Ohio Buckeye Bark and Flower

The bark of Ohio buckeye is a light tan or grey and becomes more scaly as the tree matures. Ohio buckeye have bright green palmate compound leaves, each with 5-7 ovate leaflets that are 3-6 inches long. The leaves turn to a dark green in summer and in the fall, turn a yellow color although it is not unusual to see the leaves turn various shades of orange and red.

Ohio Buckeye Fruit

Beautiful green-yellow showy flower clusters appear in spring and are followed by globular fruit. The fruit is a spiny light brown husk which contains two buckeyes, which turn a shiny dark brown color with a tan spot, resembling the eye of a deer. These buckeyes are not edible but have been considered a good luck charm since colonial times. This tree is not recommended for street use as the fruit can result in a substantial amount of litter. Ohio buckeye are great landscape trees for more remote areas and woodlands.


 All photos and references are used for educational purposes only. 

References

  1. “Aesculus glabra.” Missouri Botanical Garden: Plant Finder. Missouri Botanical Garden, n.d. Web. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2vhwxVX>
  2. Ohio buckeye.” The Morton Arboretum: Trees & Plants. The Morton Arboretum, n.d. Web. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2D3zouz>

Photos

  1. Makin, Julie. “Ohio Buckeye tree with flowers.” Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. University of Texas, 23 July 2012. Digital Image. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2CSzPDy>
  2. “Bark of Aesculus glabra.” Illinois Wildflowers: Ohio Buckeye. Illinois Wildflowers, n.d. Digital Image. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2mjqfTh>
  3. Smith, R.W. “Inflorescence and foliage of Aesculus glabra.” Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. University of Texas, 29 June 2012. Digital Image. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2qX4azs>
  4. Makin, Julie. “Close-up of developing fruit.” Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. University of Texas, 19 September 2012. Digital Image. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2ASXwtW>
  5. H. Zell. “Ohio buckeye nuts.” Wikimedia Commons. Wikimedia Commons, 18 September 2010. Digital Image. 11 January 2018. <http://bit.ly/2ARXjqF>