Videos

urban forestry

UFore Nursery Timelapse

Check out this time lapse video of our research nursery and fields created by former Team Tree member Jonathan Fillmore. Jonathan took a panoramic set of photos each week during the 2013 growing season.

Save Your Ash

Save Your Ash is an educational video for homeowners about the importance of protecting their ash trees from emerald ash borer. Mature trees provide many economic, social, and health benefits. It would be significantly cheaper to treat your ash with systemic pesticides versus having to cut down mature trees.

Additional Videos

Interested in learning more about the tree world? You are only a click away! 

You can find information on a variety of species through The Campus Trees YouTube channel. Learn information from interviews with professionals that know the plants the best!

Also take a look at the University of Minnesota Urban and Community Forestry YouTube channel. It has information on community gravel beds in Minnesota and an explanation of Dutch Elm Disease.

Check out the MNTCA channel to learn more about best planting practices, tree damage, and the MNTCA program!

Transporting a Tree

Transporting a Tree

Keeping roots moist is important during the move as moist roots help the tree establish quickly. Wrap the soil ball or container in a tarp or large garbage bag to trap moisture until planting time.  If transporting bare root trees, the roots should be covered with mulch, sawdust, burlap, or other moisture holding medium and wrapped in a large garbage bag or tarp to trap moisture until planting time.  Bare root trees should be planted as soon as possible after they arrive home to ensure roots do not dry out.

If transporting trees which are in leaf in the back of an open pickup or trailer, it is recommended that the canopy be wrapped in burlap or an old sheet to prevent wind damage to the leaves. You want to prevent further stress on the tree than is necessary. 

Planting a Containerized Tree

Planting a Containerized Tree

Step 1: Remove the tree or shrub from the container by lifting it up by the stem and tapping down on the rim of the container. 

Step 2: Check to see if there is any excess soil on top of the root system (often there is at least 4 inches of excess soil over the first main order root). Use a kabob or a straightened wire coat hanger to probe next to the stem into the soil ball until the first main lateral root is felt. If there is more than an inch of soil over these roots, use a saw to cut off the extra soil. Removing excesss soil prevents future stem problems and promotes a healthy root system.

Step 3: Check for encircling roots. Encircling roots only pose a potential problem if they are the width of a pencil or wider, so they only need ot be removed if they are this size. You can remove encircling roots by sawing 'boxing' the root ball, or sawing off the sides of the soil ball to encourage healthy, spreading roots.

Step 4: Dig a hole that will fit the soil ball width and depth. If you have difficult soil, such as clay, it is recommended that you dig out farther to loosen up the soil once you plant the tree. 

Step 5: Place the soil ball so that the first main order root is within 1-inch of the soil surface, and backfill the hole with soil. You can add water throughout the process of filling in the planting hole, so water soaks into the soil and doesn't completely runoff the soil surface at the end of planting.

Planting a Bare Root Tree

Planting a Bare Root Tree

*Remember, you want to keep roots moist while preparing the tree for planting. Always keep bare root trees root systems hydrated and protected before planting*

Step 1: Check to see if there is any dysfuntional root growth such as encircling roots. You can correct these issues before planting the tree but pruning off the roots that are growing in an unhealthy way.

​Step 2: Dig a hole that will fit the tree roots without folding or curling up the root system to fit. Often, the root system may have formed some long roots that will not fit in a tradition, round planting hole. Dig trenches to fit these longer roots so that they may continue to grow outward and into the new landscape.

Step 4: Place the root ball so that the first main order root is within 1-inch of the soil surface, and backfill the hole with soil. You can add water throughout the process of filling in the planting hole, so water soaks into the soil and doesn't completely runoff the soil surface at the end of planting.